Book cover - Getting Real - Author 37signals, Jason Fried, David Heinemeier Hansson & Matthew Linderman

Getting Real

Author 37signals, Jason Fried, David Heinemeier Hansson & Matthew Linderman

  • Release Date: 2010-04-03
  • Genre: Business & Personal Finance
Our score: 4.5
4.5
From 112 Ratings

Getting Real Summary


Getting Real - Getting Real details the business, design, programming, and marketing principles of 37signals. The book is packed with keep-it-simple insights, contrarian points of view, and unconventional approaches to software design. This is not a technical book or a design tutorial, it's a book of ideas.

Anyone working on a web app — including entrepreneurs, designers, programmers, executives, or marketers — will find value and inspiration in this book.

37signals used the Getting Real process to launch five successful web-based applications (Basecamp, Campfire, Backpack, Writeboard, Ta-da List), and Ruby on Rails, an open-source web application framework, in just two years with no outside funding, no debt, and only 7 people (distributed across 7 time zones). Over 500,000 people around the world use these applications to get things done.

Now you can find out how they did it and how you can do it too. It's not as hard as you think if you Get Real.

Getting Real Review


  • Simple but necessary for beginners

    1
    By IMQIANXUN
    It's really a good 101 book for starters. The introductions of the whole product deliver process are quite clear. All the freshman should read it before working.
  • Gret reading

    5
    By meandme22
    An amazing method for everything; not just for web apps. A must-read for any manager and entrepreneur.
  • A Must Read

    5
    By JBSNH
    Quality over quantity is the message for software companies and it applies equally to the content of this book as well. A compact wealth of great ideas for software developers, but more importantly a manifesto for any company that cares about quality, customer service and integrity. A message of ignoring user demands for ever increasing features, sticking to a set of core ideals, and being willing to expose your faults to the world is tough is tough love for most businesses in a competitive market. Use this book as your gut check every time you think more and bigger is better. This should be required reading for every college student and business executive who wishes to avoid the debacles of the last decade.
  • When u know...

    5
    By MoeIsmail
    You do much less. Great book, great writing style, highly recommended to anyone building anything
  • Great for designers and startups!

    5
    By TimoHubbard
    37 Signals has done an exceptional job at laying out a formula for starting a web based business. This is a great read for undergraduates looking for a path to startup - those who want to focus on the code and not the business "stuff" typically associated with entrepreneurship.
  • Getting real

    5
    By jirvin7
    Really helped us take our project at www.surfsports.biz from what could have been a great big, time consuming platform to build and kept us focused on the core of our app. Our customer experience has become the core impetus for making changes to our code. Thanks 37signals and we look forward to keeping it real! -Jonathan Irvin, founder, Industry Trade Directories
  • Fantastic read!

    5
    By WizKid85
    Even if you don't intend on building an app or some sort of program, these lessons still apply!
  • Good book, bad ebook

    4
    By Pavel Repin
    Broken lines, broken formatting. Even language set incorrect, so iBooks dictionary does not work with this file. Very bad quality for $12 dollars.
  • Great book, get it somewhere else

    1
    By Ry7n_
    This book on Web application design is a classic, but its presentation in the iBookstore is pretty terrible. Fly-outs inline with the text, blank pages for no reason—even LINE BREAKS MID-WORD. The presentation is so jarring that it's difficult to follow and shows none of the attention to detail that is usually attributed to the authors. You'd think a book available for free online would be able to get it right for $12, but no.

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